Typically a Female Written Genre...

Eccentric Intimacy:
Love Like a Fairy Tale
Adam Lynch
Self-Pub, May 1, 2017
Kindle ed, 252 pages, also available in paperback
Genre(s) Contemporary Romance, Christian
Source Author

Synopsis
He’s no normal person—but that’s what intrigues her the most. And he likes the fact that he can’t deduce everything about her at first glance. She does things that aren’t recognizable—simply because these things are original. There’s something about these two that makes the other curious—and that curiosity is what unconsciously keeps them together longer than they’ve ever been with anyone else before. 

They share dreams of old-fashioned romances, but as irresistible as they find each other, can they wait that long? What about trust when their relationship gets more intimate? Can she accept vulnerability in exchange for the love that he wants to give her? And can he be patient with her when she starts doing insensible things that he doesn’t understand? Are they really meant to be like the universe keeps suggesting, or is all this a wishful fairy tale in their own minds?

About the Author:  
No information is available.

My Disclaimer:  I was provided a free copy of this book by the author. I am providing an honest review for which I am receiving no compensation of any kind. All opinions are fully my own.
~ Judi E. Easley for Blue Cat Review

My Review:  
Writing a romance novel is not an easy thing. Ask any of the many women who write them. Very rarely do you see a man take on the task. It's typically a female written genre. I think that perhaps it should stay that way.

The story line of this book was easy enough to follow, but the way the story was told, was absolutely crazy. The characters were not well developed. At least not well enough to survive what they went through. The story was choppy and the flow was broken up by all the preaching. The Christian aspect of it was totally overwhelming. I have never read a Christian novel with anywhere near so much preachiness in it. It came off as pompous and boastful. 

That suits the main female character quite well. She claims to be a Christian and an artist. She's rich and throws her money around to have her own way. She drinks more than she can handle on several occasions. She's often rude. She's very attractive and uses her looks to get her way. And she's a tease with men.

The description of the trip to Kenya, which should have been amazingly graphic, sounded like it had been written by a teenage girl in her diary and was being read back to us after the fact. It had no feeling in it. This was a place they were supposed to relate to passionately.

An editor is needed to handle the misuse of words and to tone down the aggrandizement of a lot of the words that were used. Simple straightforward words will serve better in many cases.

I'm sorry that I couldn't give this book a better rating. I had been looking forward to reading it for awhile. But the amount of sermonizing and the way the author handled the story simply didn't justify it in my mind. I've read romances of all types, Christian included. That's not to say that there isn't room for new things. But if I wanted a sermon, I'd go to church. When I want a romance to read, I open a book. Opening this one was definitely disappointing. I simply cannot recommend it.